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CHANG KYEONG GUNG

07 Feb

1.The Honghwamun (Gate)

Honghwamun, the main of Changgyeonggung palace, faces east as is Myeongjeongjeon hall, the main building of the palace. This gate is believed to have been first built in the 15th year of the reign of King Seongjong(1484) and then burnt down during the Japanese invasion of 1592 and rebuilt in the eighth year of the reign of King Gwanghaegun(1616).

This is typical of the early Joseon architecture, featuring a two-story pavilion 3kan wide and 2kan deep(a kan is a traditional word of length between two columns showing different dimension according to the period), and multi-brackets atop the columns. There are three wood plank doors in the front and crimson arrow-like ornaments above the doors There is a flight of stairs in the northern part of the structure leading to the second story. The second story is wood floored and the ceiling structure is visible from the floor. Walls extend from the gate.(Treasure No. 384)

2. The Okcheongyo (Bridge)

All main halls of the Joseon palaces are approached across a stone bridge over a stream. Okcheongyo is such a bridge for Changgyeonggung palace. This 9.9m long and 6.6m wide bridge was built in 1483. The middle of the bridge is raised for kings to walk on.

The bridge is supported by twin arches. There is a carving of a monster mask between the arches to expel evil spirits. Four pillars divide the railing into five panels on either side of the bridge, and each panel has two openings.(Treasure No. 386)

3.The Myeongjeongmun (Gate)

This single pavilion, 3 kan wide and 2 kan deep, with a hipped-and gabled roof is in the center of the east covered passageway facing Myeongjeongjeon hall. Myeongjeongmun gate is not exactly on the west -east axis of the palace, but is situated 1.2m south of it. Multi-cluster brackets are placed not only on the column tops, but also on the outer tiebeams between the columns. the column plinths are round. A double door is between the columns.

The multi-bracket system and the general architectural style of this gate help us to believe it dates, together with Myeongjeongjeon hall, from the reign of King Gwanghaegun.

4.The Myeongjeongjeon (Hall)

Erected in 1484 during the reign of King Seongjong, this Myeongjeongjeon hall of Changgyeonggung palace was burnt down during the Japanese invasion in 1592 and rebuilt in 1616 during the reign of King Gwanghaegun. Unlike the main halls of Gyeongbokgung and Changdeokgung, which face south, this one faces the east. This unusual orientation for a Joseon dynasty palace was made because of its terrain.

The single-storied hall with a hipped-and-gabled roof stands on the two-tired Woldae terrace. The plinths of the pillars are square in the lower part and round in the upper portion This 5 kan wide and 3 kan deep hall has multi-cluster brackets on the column tops and outer tie-beams.

Except for the door, the building has latticed windows. Above the windows are low windows with slanted lattice designs to let in the sunlight. In the back of the hall is the throne. A folding screen of the sun and the moon is placed behind and a wooden canopy is above it. There is a recessed ceiling decorated with the Bonghwang phoenix, which was the symbol of immortality and nobility. Lotus designs were painted in Dancheong coloring on the ceiling. A 5 meters-wide stone-paved way leads to the throne hall from Myeongjeongmun gate. It has a 2.4 meter wide raised central portion reserved for kings only. Subjects followed the king on the lower sides. A pair of Bonghwang phoenixes is engraved inside heart-shaped outlines on rises of the center stairs. Stairs are engraved with arabesque, cloud, and Bosanghwa floral designs. Flanking the risers are the mythical Haetae, fire-eating legendary animals, that offer protection from fire. The two-lined stone markers, 24 in all, in front, indicate the positions of attending officials.

5.The Munjeongjeon (Hall)

The present building was completed in 1986 as a part of the reconstruction project of Changgyeonggung palace based on the finding of the excavation and various written records. It was confirmed through the excavation in 1984 that the original building stood on a base 20meters north to south and 18 meters west to east and the base had two stairs in its east and west sides. The restored Munjeongjeon hall is 3 kan wide and as many kan deep, and has square columns and multi-cluster brackets on the column tops.

The single-story building with a hipped-and-gabled roof with double-tiered eaves is 125.4 square meters in floor space and faces the south. The two-tiered flower terrace was built on the sloping terrain to the west of this building, and Munjeongmun gate was erected in the east.

The original Munjeongjeon was built in 1484 by King Seongjong and burnt down during the Japanese invasion in 1592 to be rebuilt in 1616 during the reign of King Gwanghaegun. Judging from Joseonchongdokbu Vol. X, published by the Japanese government-general in 1930, showed the east side of Munjeongjon, the building must have survived until that year.

6. The Gwancheondae (Observatory)

Soganui, a kind of astrolabe, was installed on this astronomical observatory originally erected outside Geummamun gate of Changdeokgung palace in 1688 during the reign of King Sukjong. It was moved here during the Japanese colonial rule (1910-1945).

It is 2.2m high, 2.4m wide and 2.3m deep. Five holes are bored on a stone plate (73.4cm × 52.6cm × 24.5cm) to fix a 99cm tall wind flag. (Treasure No. 851)

7.The Sungmundang(Hall)

This gabled-and-hipped structure with single-winged bracketing was built in 1830, the 30th year of King Sunjo, to replace the one that was earlier destroyed by fire in the same year. It had been built during the reign of King Gyeongjong(r. 1720-1724), the 20th King of Joseon. The front part of this 4 kan wide and 3 kan deep building is supported by five tall square stone pillars making it appear as if it were a raised pavilion. Verandas are provided on the front and the rear and on the south side of the hall.

The inside of the building consists of the central wooden floor and two rooms, on either side of the wooden floor. The signboard and the plaque were written by King Yeongjo, who was a great promoter of scholarship and learning. He used to receive and test university students here, and often held celebrations here in their honor.

8.Binyangmun (Gate)

9.The Haminjeong (Pavilion)

After Inyangjeon hall, built in 1484 during the reign of King Seongjong, was burnt down during the Japanese invasion of 1592, King Injo moved Hamindang pavilion in Ingyeonggung palace to the site of Inyangjeon in 1633, renaming it Haminjeong. King Yeongjo(r. 1724-1776) here received top winners of the national civil and military examinations called Gwageo.

This single-story pavilion has a hipped-and-gabled roof double bird-wing brackets are atop columns. The eaves are two-tiered. The wooden floor inside the inner columns are raised and the ceiling above it is latticed, while rafters are visible from the floor around the raised floor.

10. The Gyeongchunjeon (Hall)

    

Built in 1483, it was destroyed in the Japanese invasion of 1592, rebuilt in 1616, burnt down in 1830, and rebuilt in 1834, King Jeongjo and King Heonjong were born here. The Chinese characters, over the center, were written by King Sunjo. This single-story building is 7 kan wide and 4 kan deep, and has a hipped-and-gabled roof with two-tier eaves. There are verandas in front and rear. Simple brackets are on the column tops. Latticed doors are installed around the building and latticed windows are above them. The floor is made of wood and the inside ceiling is latticed. Beams are placed between the front and rear inner columns.

11.The Hwangyeongjeon Hall

This royal residence first built in 1484 during the reign of King Seongjong was burnt down during the Japanese invasion in 1592 and was rebuilt in 1616 during the reign of King Gwanghaegun. Burnt up again by a fire of 1830 It was rebuilt for the last time in 1834.

This single-storey building with a hipped-and-gabled roof is 7 kan wide and 4 kan deep and has simple, graceful double-wing brackets atop the columns. The eaves are two-tiered. The floor is wooden, and beams are crossed between the inner and outer columns. Roof rafters are exposed between the outer and inner columns, while the inner ceiling is latticed.

12.The Hamyangmun (Gate)

13.The Tongmyeongjeon (Hall)

This was the main building in the Yeonjo area where kings and their families lived. Like many buildings of the palace, Tongmyeongjeon had been burnt down several times since it was first built in 1484 during the reign of King Seongjong to be rebuilt for the last time in 1834 by King Sunjo. This 7 kan wide and 4 kan deep building has a hipped-and-gabled roof with double-tiered eaves. This building on a single-tier Woldae terrace has a roof without the ridge on top and has simple, graceful double-wing brackets atop columns. Latticed doors are installed all around the building and latticed windows are above them. Tongmyeongjeon has each veranda in front and rear. Except for the north-western section, the inside wooden floor is laid out in a large lattice pattern. The 1984 excavation confirmed that the 4 kan space in the center had originally been rooms where traces of heating flues were found. The ceilings of the inside hall are latticed, while the ceiling above the verandas is papered.

(1)Pond Near Tongmyeongjeon Hall

This square pond is 12.8m long and 5.2m wide. The pond is lined with long square stones and has exquisitely sculptured stone rails. A simple 59.4cm-wide and 256cm-long stone bridge is spanned from west to east. There are two fantastic stones and a lotus-shaped stand in the pond. The water of this pond is drawn into the pond from a fountain 4.6m away to the north. The fountain water cascades down into the pond after traveling a straight stone waterway. According to The Annals of King Seongjong, there had been a copper waterway to bring the fountain water to the pond. (Treasure No. 818)

    

14.The Yanghwadang (Hall)

Built in 1484 during the reign of King Seongjong, this royal residence was burnt in 1592 during the Japanese invasion of Korea. Rebuilt in 1616, the eighth year of the reign of King Gwanghaegun ( r. 1608-1623), it was again burnt down in 1624, the second year of the reign of King Injo (1623-1649) during the Revolt of Lee Gwal. It was soon rebuilt after the revolt. The present building was built in 1834 after a fire of 1830.

This single-storey building is 6 kan wide and 4 kan deep, and has a hipped-and-gabled roof with double eaves. It stands on a base of long and square stones. The pillars are square and have simple bird-wing brackets on the top. The inside of the building is wood-floored, and there is a 2 kan front veranda. The inner ceiling is latticed, while the rafters are revealed on slanted plastered roof between the outer and inner columns.

15.Former Museum

16. The Punggidae(Treasure No.846)

This wind streamer is believed to have been erected in 1732, the 8th year of King Yeoungjo’s reign. It has a hole on top in which a pole with a long, narrow flag could be fitted for measuring the wind direction and force. The pedestal is 92.4cm high and the octagonal pole is 135.7cm high, which totaled 228.1cm. high. (Treasure No. 846).

17.The Yeongchunheon-Jipbokheon

18.Placenta Burial Marker

19.Placenta Burial Marker

Chundangji, consisting of two ponds, was made in 1909. The smaller pond is 1,107 square meters and the larger one is 6,483 square meters. The 366-square-meter island and the bridge were made in 1984. King Yeonsangun was digging a large pond on the site of Chundangji when he was dethroned in 1506. The site had been used as palace rice paddies until 1909.

20.The Greenhouse

21.The Gwandeokjeong (Pavilion)

22.The Jipchunmun (Gate)

23.The Gwahangmun (Gate)

24.The Wolgeunmun (Gate)

25.The Seoninmun (Gate)

 

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